Musings on Australia Day…

January 26, 2012 at 3:52 pm (With thanks) (, )

I’ve always felt conflicted about today, “Australia Day”. I am proud to be Australian, and I love this country deeply, knowing I am of it, and glad of that. I feel connected to the land, having grown up on it, and proud of the wonderful achievements of its people. But January 26 represents so much pain and loss and injustice, more than two hundred years of persecution. To many people it is Invasion Day, or Survival Day. And while I love this country and honour the land every day of the year, it is on this day that I struggle most.

So today I hope and wish and pray that this is the year we start to redress the balance, that the gap closes, that social injustice is addressed, that the apology becomes a foundation for real change and not just a nice memory, that our honouring of the land and its people extends to real, practical transformation…

“Today we stand in footsteps millennia old.
May we acknowledge the traditional owners
whose cultures and customs have nurtured,
and continue to nurture, this land,
since men and women awoke from the great dream.
We honour the presence of these ancestors
who reside in the imagination of this land
and whose irrepressible spirituality
flows through all creation.”

Acknowledgement of Country by Jonathan Hill, an Aboriginal poet living in NSW.

Advertisements

Permalink Leave a Comment

With thanks… Monday January 23… New moon blessings, and Happy Chinese New Year!

January 23, 2012 at 1:40 pm (Magic, Moon phases, With thanks) (, , , )

Today I wish everyone a magical new moon and an enchanted Chinese New Year, and a year to come full of love, joy and inspiration. It’s the perfect time to make a wish – new moon, new year – then take steps to make it come true. Wishes focus our attention and our intention, and make the path forward and the way to manifest them clearer – then it is up to us to make them happen. A book won’t write itself, a record won’t record itself, your artistic expression requires time carved out of your day to allow it to go from your heart to the canvas or the crafting… Place value on your dreams, and give yourself the gift of time to make them come true…

Today I am also a little surprised – it was on Chinese New Year 2009 that I began writing these daily gratitude notes, so it’s been three years of taking the time to gather my thoughts each night and think of all the things I was grateful for that day. Some days it was easier than others, but part of me thinks that it’s those days that are the most important, the ones where I had to dig deep and look hard for the good things. Because they are always there, if you look. Always something to be grateful for, even when you’re sad or disappointed or in pain. My bad migraine days are always a challenge, but I can always find something to be glad of – painkillers (ha ha), sympathy and healing pats from my beloved, cool breeze on my hot cheeks, the beauty of a jacaranda tree in bloom, the scent of frangipanis, a particularly delicious cup of tea, a letter from a friend, someone telling me they loved my book…

And even when I’m frantically snowed under at the magazines (like today), I am grateful that I got lots done, that I finished several pages, that something I was waiting on finally arrived. Yes I’m feeling swamped, with three magazines going to print on Friday, but I was grateful for watermelon, grateful I’d brought a salad so I didn’t have to waste time leaving the office, grateful for the luxury of time on the bus to read a little…

I am also grateful that Cutes met me after work so we could walk home together, grateful two packages he’d been waiting on had arrived, grateful I could do some work for Juz when we got home – plotting and planning and dreaming and scheming J

I am grateful to author Felicity Pulman for her mention of Seven Sacred Sites on her page, and that someone ordered four copies of A Magical Journey…

I’m grateful for a beautiful necklace from Mum and Dad, as a thank you for the photo book I made for our friends, and I’m grateful to my sister for dropping off a box of books to a store in Mandurah for me, especially as it ended up being a bit trickier than anticipated.

So, even though I didn’t get to spend any time on my book writing today, I am grateful that I fitted so much else in, grateful for my wonderful family and friends, and grateful to my beloved for our magical life together… (And to think this started as a very brief note!)

Permalink Leave a Comment

A beautiful review of Seven Sacred Sites…

January 23, 2012 at 3:18 am (Uncategorized)

By wonderful author Felicity Pulman.

Seven Sacred Sites is a treasure trove for the `armchair traveller’ as well as for those seeking their own spiritual enlightenment. Part travelogue, this is also an insightful and moving account of Serene’s journeys to seven of the world’s most wondrous and sacred sites: the ruins of Machu Picchu and the mighty Amazon river and jungle in South America; the sacred Isle of Avalon at Glastonbury and also the mystical circle of Stonehenge in England; the pyramids and temples of ancient Egypt with their divine secrets and mysteries; the Big Island of Hawaii, with its fiery volcano; the Camino, an ancient pilgrim path leading to `the field of stars’ and the burial place of St James of Compostela in Spain; and the earth magic of Uluru and the Red Centre in Australia.
Each section begins with a comprehensive and fascinating history of the site, describing its origins and geography and its significance in terms of the sacred, the pantheon of gods, goddesses and spirits associated with each place. Each section also details special knowledge pertaining to the site; its purpose, its psychic connections and the ancient wisdom contained there, along with `an armchair traveller’s guide’ – ways to experience the sacred and mystical power of these sites even if you’re unable to make the journey in person. Each section includes a `postcard’ – from Shirley MacLaine, Doreen Virtue, Cassandra Eason, Lucy Cavendish and others – recounting their own personal journey and experience of the site.
The author’s love of nature shines through and the beauty of each site is lovingly described, while each section is crammed with interesting facts. Every site has its own divine power and capacity to bring insight and healing, and Serene gives an interpretation at the beginning of each section. So, while visiting Machu Picchu, she asks us to `journey deep into the lush Amazon jungle and take part in ancient rituals that cause the death of the old self and lead to spiritual rebirth, then climb the sacred peaks of the Andes to the breathtaking ruins of Machu Picchu, and feel your spirit soar above the world, reborn and renewed.’
For Glastonbury, she asks us to `immerse yourself in the ancient magic of the priestesses and druids of the British Isles, attune yourself to the beating heart of the earth and its sacred energies, and hear the whisper of history in this mystical place where the early Christians worshipped, King Arthur lived and the wise women made their potions.’ In this section she talks about the magic of herbs and attuning yourself to the Wheel of the Year, describing ancient ceremonies that celebrated the changing seasons and the cycles of agriculture. Likewise at Stonehenge she details the importance and power of the lunar calendar while inviting us to `unlock the secrets held within these ancient stones and connect to the energy of the cosmos…’
Serene talks about `leaving your ordinary life behind you as you set out on an ancient pilgrimage to find your true self …’ as she describes the pain and joy of walking the Camino. When visiting Uluru and the Red Centre, she suggests that you `absorb the unique energy of this ancient monolith and the powerful vibrations of the desert landscape that surrounds it’ so that you might find `a spirit of place and a sense of environmental consciousness as you open yourself up to the lessons of the people who have lived in its shadow for tens of thousands of years.’
While walking through the temples and pyramids of Egypt she advises you to `feel the masculine and feminine energies of the universe flowing through you … allowing these ancient powers to unify the disparate parts of your soul, creating union and a sense of oneness.’
`Find healing and happiness,’ she says, when you visit The Big Island in Hawaii. `Feel your soul being cleansed by the fiery and passionate volcanic energy of this tropical island, and your heart opening up to joy as you climb sacred mountains, bathe in crystal waterfalls, swim with dolphins and feel the presence of ancient gods and goddesses in a paradise of sunshine and deep healing.’
It’s hard to do justice to the wealth of knowledge and information contained in Seven Sacred Sites. But most of all, Serene has given us a deeply personal and inspirational account of her journeys to these sacred places: this is a journey of the heart and soul as well as a physical journey. She details the highs and lows of her visits and the insights she’s gained, often at some personal cost and sometimes accompanied by danger and/or discomfort. I’ve been lucky enough to have visited several of these sites in the past, and reading about them brought back beautiful memories along with new insights – and a deep regret that I hadn’t read Serene’s book BEFORE I travelled there. But my eyes have now been opened to what I missed before, and I’m looking forward to revisiting some of those sites and venturing to new ones, this time with Serene’s book under my arm and, hopefully, with the same open heart and expectation of adventure and illumination. Highly recommended.

© Felicity Pulman, 2012

Permalink Leave a Comment

How much is too much?

January 10, 2012 at 4:37 pm (Publishing) (, , )

I had an interesting discussion with two friends who are writers the other day, about how much marketing yourself and public speaking and attending events etc are expected these days from authors. It was a little disheartening to hear, in some cases, how important this is now to publishers, and how little your work itself weighs in if you aren’t deemed “marketable”… I’d like to think that’s not true, but we certainly are in rapidly changing times, and most courses I’ve done or articles I’ve read recommend being on Twitter and doing talks and being part of all kinds of social media marketing things that really are not my forte. I have so much admiration for writers who can do talks and workshops and such – but I (and many amazing writers I know) would much rather be able to write our books and let them speak for themselves – that’s why I’m a writer anyway, because I’m shy and would rather express myself through writing…

I’m also curious about how much it actually helps if you do bare your soul, Tweet all day, blog more regularly than me (ha ha), learn to speak in public and do it, network (I hate that word) etc… Does it translate to sales? Or do people just know your name but not read/buy your books/CDs/art etc? Can you be too available and have a negative impact on your book sales? I think (or would like to think) that maybe all the new styles of promotion are part of it, but are much less vital than is portrayed. Anne Tyler does very few interviews and has no blog or Twitter account, but sells millions of books (and inspires blogs – there’s a good one here). Debora Geary‘s wonderful A Modern Witch series is a massive success on Amazon, mostly thanks to word of mouth because they’re great books that people recommend to their friends. Writer Steven Lewis has lots of readers of his wonderful site and informative blog, but some people have had the nerve to complain if he puts a link to one of the books he has for sale – they want to take advantage of all his free content, but won’t buy his books. There are bands with tens of thousands of “friends” who can’t get anyone to a gig. A friend’s band has thousands of hits on YouTube, but has only sold a few copies of the record. So does social media and networking actually work?

There’s an interesting blog about it by writer Yvonne Coppard about the topic, and Harper Lee, here, and I’ve read a few others recently that I’ll try to find and add here… Update: One discussion was this one, which is an Amazon forum…

And now, back to my writing. Not much point with all the other stuff if it stops you from doing that! xx

Funny – when I hit “publish” on this, a quote by Anne Rice appeared on the side. (I loved words. I love to sing them and speak them and even now, I must admit, I have fallen into the joy of writing them. — Anne Rice) I’d been thinking of her as I wrote this one – she’s always been one of my favourite authors, and has remained quite private – but didn’t include her as an example… But now I have…

Permalink Leave a Comment

Thyme For Trust… The final book in the Janna Mysteries…

January 6, 2012 at 6:45 pm (Book reviews, Favourite books, Interesting stories) (, , , )

A review of the final book in Felicity Pulman’s wonderful Janna Mysteries series… Definitely one of my favourites! They’re available in paperback in Aussie bookshops and from Amazon, and for Kindle and other eBook readers… xx

Thyme for Trust

The sixth and final instalment in the awesome Janna Mysteries.

I’m so sad that this is the last chapter of Janna’s story, but so happy that it was able to continue until its end, after a lengthy pause between books four and five. Thyme for Trust is a wonderful conclusion to a wonderful series, with all the questions raised throughout Janna’s adventures answered in smart, satisfying and non-predictable ways. The book opens with the Empress Matilda – who Janna so admires, and has helped in the past – trapped in Oxeneford Castle and laid siege by her bitter rival (and cousin) King Stephen and his men. In her own way, Janna too is trapped. While she has found her father and he’s welcomed her into his family, she is hated by her cruel stepmother and mean half siblings, and her life is in as much danger as that of the Empress.

While she fights her own war at home, Janna is also fighting to bring her mother’s murderer to justice, prove the innocence of her beloved, convince her father not to marry her off to an old but “suitable” suitor, protect her friends and help Matilda escape to safety. It’s a suspenseful, action-filled page-turner that also retains depth and emotion – all the characters are complex and well written, and even those ranged against Janna have their own motivations for their actions, eliciting at least a little sympathy from the heroine, and the reader.

Alongside Janna’s personal story is woven the dramatic real-life history of twelfth century English royalty and the bitter battles for the throne, which creates a rich tapestry of medieval life and adds colour, tension and realism. Yet it is Janna and her challenging, eventful and life-changing journey that most captivates. The author has created a wonderful character, brave, independent and strong in an age that expected little from girls, feisty and far from perfect, but enchanting all the same.

I loved that her quest to avenge her mother’s death was finally so close to completion, and also that she realised in that moment the toll it had taken on her and those around her, what it had cost her in terms of friendships, and the consequences of her actions on people she loved yet still wounded. I loved that she encountered some of her old friends and could see how much she had helped them, as well as accepting that they had changed and made her a better person too. I loved that she really did grow up over the course of the series, and was able to see the mistakes she had made, and to recognise that she still had much to learn. And I loved that the ending was realistic rather than happy-ever-after, and that although she found great joy, it came with sacrifice, loss and bitter grief as well.

In all, I loved that this final book so satisfyingly brought all six together, and while I am sad to farewell Janna and her world, I am so glad for the richness of her story and the magical journey it takes readers on. Thank you Felicity Pulman for a wonderful series…

And if you haven’t read any of this great series, here are my reviews of all six books… They’re available in paperback in Aussie bookstores and on Amazon, and as eBooks for Kindle as well…

Rosemary for Remembrance

The beautiful first book in a wonderful series.

Young Janna lives in a tiny cottage on the edge of the forest with her mother Eadgyth, the village herbwife. But twelfth century England is a dangerous time to be a woman and a healer, and the oppressive influence of the new priest and the jealous male apothecary can be felt throughout. When Eadgyth dies suddenly, Janna suspects her mother has been poisoned, and vows to find the killer and avenge her death. But the villagers and the Church are set against her, superstition and fear has warped the small community, and several people have explosive secrets they’ll kill to protect. As Janna tries to unravel the mystery of her mother’s death and the identity of her mysterious father, she realises that her own life is in danger, and her quest becomes more desperate.

Although I had never considered these to be crime novels, Janna does have to solve a murder and several other mysteries, and reveals great detective skills. The writing is suspenseful and the plot twists intriguing, yet it is not limited to the crime genre – it is also a beautifully written story of Janna’s coming of age, and there are elements of romance, action and medieval English history woven in (some school teachers even use it as part of the curriculum). The characters are fascinating and represent powerful archetypes – the healer, the maiden, the crone, the protector, the innocent, the villain – as well as being totally engaging and true to life. I especially love the descriptions of English life in this period, the clash between the Old Ways and the Church, and the magical properties of the herbs that the wise woman and her daughter work with to heal people and protect their community. (Anyone who loves Juliet Marillier’s beautiful books will love the enchantment of these.)

And Janna is a wonderful heroine. Not perfect by any means – she’s hot headed and hot tempered, speaks before she thinks, and is so stubbornly independent that it’s often to her detriment. But she is kind too, and fiercely intelligent, with a thirst for knowledge and justice that compels her to leave all that she’s ever known and set off on the quest that will unfold over the next five books – to find her father, avenge her mother’s death, and discover her own heart… Each of the Janna Mysteries ends with the solving of an epic mystery – along with more questions, so you are left desperate to start reading the next one (even now, as I re-read them all)…

Although it’s many years since I was a “young adult”, this series will appeal to anyone who loves adventure stories with mystery, historical weight and a magical twist.

Rue for Repentance

The second book in a wonderful, mysterious series.

Felicity Pulman’s storytelling prowess continues in this epic story of love, revenge, mystery and adventure. Young Janna, who had to flee her home after her mother was poisoned, her cottage was burned down around her and the whole village turned against her, starts this book running for her life through the ominous forest. Disguised as a boy to protect her on many different levels, she finds herself teaming up with a fellow fugitive and being taken on as a worker in the fields of a manor. But there is mystery afoot, and she finds herself playing detective again as the scenes of several supposed accidents are each marked with a posy of rue. Can she find the culprit, and the motive, before the crimes escalate any further? What will she do when she discovers who owns the manor, and their relationship to her enemy? Can she make peace with the two men she cares about? And will she be able to save the life of an innocent child, or be blamed for the ultimate crime?

I first read the Janna Mysteries a few years ago, but on discovering that the final two books of the series have now been published, I’m re-reading the first four in preparation as I wait for them to arrive. And they’re just as involving, intriguing and suspenseful on a second read as a first. The author creates such a realistic world, filled with characters you care about, mysteries with many suspects, and a twist of enchantment that will draw you in to the lives and loves of these medieval country folk. Each of the books is unique, set in a totally different location and with many new (as well as old favourite) characters, and can be read on its own as a self-contained mystery. But as part of the series each has even more weight, and seeing Janna learn and grow through each adventure is a lot of fun.

Lilies for Love

The third book in the wonderful Janna Mysteries.

In this instalment young Janna, on the run from the ruthless man who plots to kill her to protect his secret, seeks sanctuary in the abbey. Despite her distrust of the Church and her dislike of the Abbess, she comes to like life among the nuns, and is surprised when she makes a friend, and finds a kindly old infirmarian who continues her education as a healer. While her main goal in being there – to learn to read so she can unravel the secrets of the letter her father sent her mother before she was born – seems thwarted, she finds a new sense of confidence and purpose in healing the sick and advising those around her, and she continues to learn much about herself and the world.

Janna is again faced with a murder and several other crimes to solve, and the pace is brisk and never dull, with much intrigue and mystery, and the introduction of a few shadowy, dangerous characters. Life behind the abbey walls is not quite as peaceful as you’d imagine, and there are a few sinister plots to unravel. The various nuns Janna comes to know are fleshed out with great depth – and the kindness, serenity and faith of some of them is well balanced with the petty jealousies and spiritual searchings of others in this group of women cut off from the world and dedicated, some more willingly than others, to God’s work. It’s a testament to the skill of the author that there are no caricatures amongst the characters, and that it never seems strange that a teenager is the one to seek justice, solve crimes and see to the truth of a situation.

Janna is also growing up, and in this adventure she comes to question her own religious beliefs, and those of her mother, and is shocked as she learns more about her parent’s past. She also comes into contact with the two men she cares most about, who she thought she’d never see again, and is torn between the longing in her heart for love and protection, and her determination to continue her quest to prosecute her mother’s killer and discover the identity of her father.

This is another beautifully written book, with so much research put into the historical narrative – as the Empress Matilda defends her claim to the English throne from her cousin Stephen of Blois – as well as the herbal medicaments and potions that Janna dispenses to the sick, and the flowers which are used to symbolise so much in convent life. Suspenseful and intriguing, it’s hard to put the book down, and the resolution at the end, while wonderfully played out, only brings more questions, and an eagerness to quickly begin number four…

Willows for Weeping

Book four in a magical six-book series.

I love this series – it’s so magical and fun, with a good dose of mystery and a teenage protagonist who has to solve a crime (or two) as she continues her quest to find her father and avenge her mother’s death. At the end of book three Janna was surprised to find herself enjoying life in the abbey, where she had found friendship, learning and a sense of purpose as a healer. But her quest remains more important to her than her own happiness, and so, having finally learnt to read and with some new clues to her father’s identity, she leaves the security of the abbey and heads out on the road to Winchestre with some pilgrims, determined to track down her remaining parent. They’re a rag tag bunch, each having their own intriguing story, beliefs and motives, and Janna isn’t sure who she can trust (and she learns some hard lessons when she reads a few people the wrong way). There’s plenty of action – early on they stumble across a dead man carrying a message that could change the fortunes of the king, one of the pilgrims is murdered inside the circle of Stonehenge, and as Janna gets closer to the truth of the culprit, danger swirls ever nearer. As in all the Janna books, the heroine is smart, kind and fearless, yet she is also flawed, with a quick temper and a naivety that frequently gets her into trouble, but makes her all the more endearing. All the characters are interesting and multi-dimensional, making you feel deeply for them, and the historical figures and true events combined with the imagined lives of others creates a captivating story. As in previous instalments, the author manages to have all the mysteries solved by the end of each book, while also opening up new questions that leave you desperate to read the next one! I first read this book more than two years ago, and was devastated to learn that number five and six were indefinitely delayed. When it was announced recently that the final two in the series were about to be published, I read the first four books again in preparation, and they were just as enchanting and satisfying the second time around.

Sage for Sanctuary

The long-awaited fifth book in the Janna Mysteries series.

There were a few years between this book and its predecessor, and many fans have been waiting anxiously to discover what Janna would do next, and whether her quest to find her father and avenge her mother’s death would be fulfilled. None should be disappointed, for this is another beautiful, intriguing story, and adds so much more to Janna’s character, her choices and her life. It opens in medieval Winchestre, where Janna is awaiting the return of her father from Normandy. He is a wealthy and influential man whose identity she has just discovered, but he knows nothing of her existence. It looks like she will meet him soon – but within the first few pages Janna’s fortunes take a turn for the worse. Her purse, containing proof of her identity, her link to her father and all her money, is stolen, and she ends up having to work in a tavern just to survive. As the story unfolds there are many mysteries, and many dangers, that plucky young Janna must face. She becomes swept up in a royal scandal, the assassin who tried to kill her some time ago returns and tries again, and she finally meets her father – and her new family, who hate her with a passion that looks like it could lead to murder.

I was swept up in the action from the first page, and was excited that not only does Janna find her father in this book, she also realises which of the two men she has loved for so long is the one she truly wants – it would have been too cruel if we’d had to wait for the next book for that one! Janna’s decision is slowly and gently arrived at, and the process she goes through to realise the truth of her heart reveals a new maturity on her part. Of course there are many obstacles put in her way (and she may not be able to marry him anyway – a dilemma that is left for the next book), but she has decided at last. I was surprised to read one Amazon review that said her decision between Hugh and Godric was sudden and unexplained, for it was not at all. Janna does much soul searching before she realises who she loves and why, and throughout the story she learns much about herself and others, while also solving several crimes, continuing her herbal medicine work and becoming clearer about what she wants to do with her life. I loved this book as much as I loved the previous four, and can’t wait for the final instalment!

Thyme for Trust

The sixth and final instalment in the awesome Janna Mysteries.

I’m so sad that this is the last chapter of Janna’s story, but so happy that it was able to continue until its end, after a lengthy pause between books four and five. Thyme for Trust is a wonderful conclusion to a wonderful series, with all the questions raised throughout Janna’s adventures answered in smart, satisfying and non-predictable ways. The book opens with the Empress Matilda – who Janna so admires, and has helped in the past – trapped in Oxeneford Castle and laid siege by her bitter rival (and cousin) King Stephen and his men. In her own way, Janna too is trapped. While she has found her father and he’s welcomed her into his family, she is hated by her cruel stepmother and mean half siblings, and her life is in as much danger as that of the Empress.

While she fights her own war at home, Janna is also fighting to bring her mother’s murderer to justice, prove the innocence of her beloved, convince her father not to marry her off to an old but “suitable” suitor, protect her friends and help Matilda escape to safety. It’s a suspenseful, action-filled page-turner that also retains depth and emotion – all the characters are complex and well written, and even those ranged against Janna have their own motivations for their actions, eliciting at least a little sympathy from the heroine, and the reader.

Alongside Janna’s personal story is woven the dramatic real-life history of twelfth century English royalty and the bitter battles for the throne, which creates a rich tapestry of medieval life and adds colour, tension and realism. Yet it is Janna and her challenging, eventful and life-changing journey that most captivates. The author has created a wonderful character, brave, independent and strong in an age that expected little from girls, feisty and far from perfect, but enchanting all the same.

I loved that her quest to avenge her mother’s death was finally so close to completion, and also that she realised in that moment the toll it had taken on her and those around her, what it had cost her in terms of friendships, and the consequences of her actions on people she loved yet still wounded. I loved that she encountered some of her old friends and could see how much she had helped them, as well as accepting that they had changed and made her a better person too. I loved that she really did grow up over the course of the series, and was able to see the mistakes she had made, and to recognise that she still had much to learn. And I loved that the ending was realistic rather than happy-ever-after, and that although she found great joy, it came with sacrifice, loss and bitter grief as well.

In all, I loved that this final book so satisfyingly brought all six together, and while I am sad to farewell Janna and her world, I am so glad for the richness of her story and the magical journey it takes readers on. Thank you Felicity Pulman for a wonderful series.

Permalink 2 Comments

Symbolically Adopt an Endangered Animal through WFF

January 3, 2012 at 6:47 pm (Causes) (, , , , , , )

I used some of my Christmas money to symbolically adopt a polar bear through WWF and the Hunger Site. And I was overwhelmed when a dear friend adopted a snowy owl for me for my birthday through WWF Australia (which looks a lot like Harry Potter’s beloved Hedwig). It’s a beautiful way to donate to a wonderful charity that works so hard to save and protect endangered animals, providing funds for them, and also adding a personal edge that makes it even more meaningful. I got an adorable certificate with a picture of the snowy owl, which I’ve put on my wall.

Buy Charity Gifts from $50 with WWF Animal Adoptions
Adopting an animal is a great way to show a loved one that you care not only for them, but also for the world around you. For a one-off fee, you will not only be providing funds to help an endangered species survive in the wild, but also giving a great gift. You can adopt a tiger, an orangutan, a panda, a pygmy elephant and more…

What Will the Recipient Get from the Charity Gift?
* Collectible display folder with photo of your chosen animal.
* Adoption certificate.
* Informative fact sheet about the animal.

You can also “adopt” an animal via a monthly payment, and receive:
* A cuddly soft toy of the animal.
* An adoption pack.
* Updates from the field.

If you adopt a tiger for instance, you are helping to:
* Restore fragmented areas of habitat so tigers can move between them.
* Strengthen anti-poaching patrols around nature reserves.
* Reduce conflict between people and tigers.
* Reduce poaching and illegal trade of live tigers and tiger parts.
* Ensure conservation laws are enforced.
Your support will also help fund other essential WWF conservation work around the world. Their priorities at the moment include protecting sea turtles, dugongs, whales, dolphins, tigers, orangutans, pandas, pygmy elephants and rock wallabies.

About WWF
With more than 40 years experience at an international level, and more than 25 years of operation in Australia, WWF is the world’s largest and most influential conservation organisation. Founded in 1961, WWF is active in more than a hundred countries and has close to five million supporters internationally. WWF’s global mission is to stop the degradation of the planet’s natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature. In Australia and throughout the oceanic region, WWF works with governments, businesses and communities so that people and nature can thrive within their fair share of the planet’s natural resources.
WWF-Australia is part of the WWF International Network, the world’s leading, independent conservation organisation. In Australia WWF also works closely with Indigenous communities to protect the country’s native plants and animals and their habitats in order to deliver enduring conservation outcomes. WWF-Australia is a not-for-profit organisation with nearly 70% of our annual income donated by our dedicated supporters. Their new five-year plan has identified six important initiatives to capitalise on WWF-Australia’s strengths:
Great Barrier Reef
Southwest Australia Ecoregion
Transforming Markets
Heart of Borneo
Climate Change
Coral Triangle / Southwest Pacific

Permalink Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: